TOM CRUISE & KATIE HOLMES SIGN SETTLEMENT AGREEMENT

After two weeks of being tabloid stars Tom Cruise and Katie Holmes surprisingly hammered out a marital settlement agreement. What looked like a divorce that was going to be dragged through the media and court system has come to an amicable resolution. Cruise and Holmes decided to avoid a long legal battle and do what is best for their six-year old daughter, Suri.

In a statement, jointly prepared by both parties, sent to CNN by Cruise both parties have expressed their desire to keep the divorce a family matter.

To paraphrase the statement:

We are dedicated to cooperating as parents to accomplishing what is in our daughter’s best interests. We want to keep isues affecting our family private and show our respect for each other’s dedication to each of our respective way of thinking and support each other’s roles as parents.”

The martial settlement agreement has saved a lot of embarrassment and emotional pain for not only Cruise and Holmes, but also for people close to them. If a court battle would have been the route for this divorce, Cruise would have suffered damage to his public image and Scientology would have walked away with some battle wounds.

The settlement agreement has been signed and the case settled. From initial reports Holmes will be the primary parent who is responsible for Suri on a daily basis. This part of the agreement worked out for both parties because Cruise was often away from the home due to his career. Another component of the agreement is religion. Though Holmes is protective about the exposure Suri will have to Scientology, Cruise is still free to teach his daughter about his religion.

Divorces with martial settlement agreements are becoming more common. Couples want to save their monies for life after the divorce and not bleed themselves dry in a full blown court drama. Also, the emotional toll of having to relive the pain and suffering of divorce is a top reason couples are figuring how to work out their own affairs and get them into a legal agreement.

Holmes had hired three law firms in three states. You only need one law firm backing you with No Contest Divorce Law, LLC. If you are looking to have a martial settlement agreement, No Contest Divorce Law, LLC can create a legal document which will protect your agreed upon rights. To get started call 215-398-6760 or click on the words SETTLEMENT AGREEMENT. Go to our Divorce Master for a free case analysis and file your simple, uncontested, no-fault divorce case today.

SOCIAL SECURITY – A BENEFIT OF TEN YEARS OF MARRIAGE

If you have been married for ten years or more you may qualify for Social Security benefits through your spouse. There are four requirements which you need to fulfill in order to apply for benefits.

The first one is having been married ten or more years to your spouse. Below are the other three:

  1. You are unmarried;
  2. You are at least 62 years old; and
  3. You are not entitled to a higher Social Security benefit on your own record.

Do keep in mind if you remarry you will most likely lose this Social Security benefit, unless you remarry the same spouse. If you do remarry and the marriage ends in divorce, annulment or a deceased spouse you may qualify for benefits from the initial spouse you married.

You do not have to rely on your spouse to fill out an application for benefits. If he or she qualifies you can go ahead and initiate the paperwork for your benefits regardless of the action your spouse may or may not have taken.

In the event that your spouse becomes deceased you may qualify for benefits as a surviving spouse. In this case the requirements are slightly different, though you must have still been married for at least ten or more years. Listed below are the other two general requirements:

  1. You are at least age 60, if you are disabled then you can apply at age 50; and
  2. You are not entitled to a higher Social Security benefit on your own record.

Benefits paid to a surviving or divorced spouse will not affect benefits paid to family members under the same record. To receive an estimate of your possible benefits you can contact a representative at your local Social Security office.

As you are considering your assets and debts in your marriage, you may also want to have a settlement agreement which will legally protect your financial future. No Contest Divorce Law, LLC also concentrates on settlement agreements, call 215-398-6760 for more information or click on SETTLEMENT AGREEMENT to learn more.

6 FINANCIAL ITEMS OFTEN OVERLOOKED IN DIVORCE

You have decided to get divorced. Where do you begin? A top priority is putting your finances in order. This will give you a solid start once the divorce is final and minimize potential surprises. Let’s be honest, you’ve probably already had enough surprises for a while.

At the top of your list should be getting a credit report. Order them right away. You can get a free credit report from each of the reporting agencies each year. Once you get them go over them with a fine toothed-comb and see if there are any discrepancies or items you may have forgotten to include in your settlement agreement– for example, credit card debt.

You are entitled to a free credit report every twelve months, that’s once a year. The top three companies you want to make sure you get a report from are Equifax, TransUnion and Experian. Some of the information you can expect to find in your credit report include: how you pay your bills, where you live, if you have been sued, if you have filed for bankruptcy and/or if you have been arrested. Keep in mind this information is used by employers, landlords, insurers and applications for credit. Also, beware of imposter websites – we suggest you look up the Federal Trade Commission for details.

Close joint credit cards, if you are not prohibited by a court. The last thing you want to learn is that your spouse went on a spending spree and you are now responsible for this debt.

Tax refunds, if filed jointly, a refund check will be sent in both your name and your spouse’s name or direct-deposited into an account. Use a settlement agreement to make sure the refund is divided between both of you.

With frequent flier miles you have a couple of options. You can either have tickets issued to one of the parties or one of the spouses can monetarily compensate the other for the points.

If Insurance is prepaid, such as house, life, disability and health insurance, then determine the amount that is currently prepaid. Prepayments can be considered part of your marital assets when valuing and dividing up property and finances.

Timeshares can also be dealt with in a few different ways. You and your spouse can continue to own it jointly, one spouse retain it (often at a lesser value than it’s purchase price, since timeshares are usually worth less than what is owed on them- consider an appraisal to find out for sure), or you can agree to sell the timeshare and split any equity or debt.

Professional dues and magazine subscriptions normally offer a significant discount when prepaid two to three years in advance. If monies from your shared accounts were used to pay for this make sure you account for this when reviewing your finances.

No Contest Divorce Law, LLC can legally help you protect your financial assets by preparing a settlement agreement which will be legally binding. If you and your spouse can agree upon how you are going to divide your property and finances, a settlement agreement can save you money. Contact No Contest Divorce Law, LLC at 215-398-6760 or click on the words SETTLEMENT AGREEMENT to learn more.

MARITAL SETTLEMENT AGREEMENTS HELP WITH NEW SCHOOL YEAR

The school year is about to start for many students throughout the state of Pennsylvania. Changes from a summer schedule to the scholastic schedule will soon start to affect your family as you settle into new routines. This is a good time to pull out your marital settlement agreement and review details for the upcoming school year.

If you are divorcing in Pennsylvania and are currently working out your marital settlement agreement we have some areas you may want to consider to help this time of year run smoothly for you and your family. Will physical custody of the children change between you and your spouse as your children head into the new school year? Have you decided if your children spend every other summer, or every summer, with one individual? Prepare a child custody schedule to ensure a seamless transition for your children from one household to the other.

Another consideration is splitting summer time between two households. How will you handle vacations that are away from home? Will your children be spending time at family functions such as family reunions?

Divorce means that you must divide child rearing responsibilities differently. Think about the roles and responsibilities which will play out during the school year. Will one parent have sole responsibility for educating the children? How will you distribute responsibilities for your child, such as extra-curricular activities? Will one person be in charge of pick-ups and another for dropping the kids off for different school events? Do you want both parents to be involved in picking up the children from school? Think about how your choices will affect your kids. Will they be embarrassed by other kids talking about their divorced parents switching off pick up times and going to different homes? Talk with your children about these aspects of your divorce that affect them.

A helpful way to plan the school year and family roles is to get a copy of the school calendar. Most major activities will already be planned out for the school year and then you can easily add extra-curricular activities to your family’s schedules.

Look into the future and think about if you want to make provisions in your marital settlement agreement about how you want to make decisions about the children’s schooling. Your children’s schedules and needs will change as they grow older. How will you make decisions about their future needs? Will one person have authority in some areas to make final decisions?

Don’t forget to add how you are going to cover extracurricular expenses. Will you split them? Will the highest income earner be solely responsible? Also, how are you going to handle making sure homework is completed now that you are divorced? Will the parent who does not have custody check-in with the kids to make sure they are meeting their scholastic responsibilities? How will you share information about the children now that you are divorced? Do you both have online access to their progress? Don’t be shy about asking the school to send duplicate reports to each parent.

Keep in mind that the overall goal should be to put your children first. They love both parents and when divorced individuals work together for the future of their children they not only model positive behavior, but also give them a sense of security. Remember to always do what is in the best interest of your children.

SPECIAL NEEDS CHILDREN & MARITAL SETTLEMENT AGREEMENTS

When working out a marital settlement agreement with your spouse, consider the current and future special needs of your child. This includes what happens when your child becomes an adult. Your special needs child will benefit greatly if you and your spouse take the time to work in a collaborative manner. Otherwise the situation can become quiet traumatic for your child and cause long-term damage.

When determining the child visitation schedule with your spouse, remember to pay close attention to the needs of your child. All children need consistency and solid structure in their lives, especially special needs children. Moving between homes can make children feel destabilized. Transitions for special needs children, especially if they do not understand the concept of time, can add to a child’s confusion.

If your child will be traveling between homes after your divorce, consider what they will need when traveling and when they are living in the second home. Some items to take into account include being close to a medical facility and any necessary medical equipment. This includes medical equipment for moving the child between homes and equipment that needs to be in both homes in order for your child to be comfortable. Take time to consider the details. This is especially important if one parent has been the primary caretaker. The non-caretaking parent may not know how to handle certain situations such as:

  1. Special diets;
  2. How to administer medication;
  3. Managing behavior (including potential triggers); and
  4. Preferences of a non-verbal child.

Consider how education will be handled once your are divorced. Will your child be starting in a new school? Are there special considerations that need to be put in place for the child’s new school, including the signing of legal papers? Will both parents have legal custody of the child? Will one parent sign school papers or will your agreement require for both parents to sign-off? Some other questions you may want to answer consider in the educational section of your marital settlement agreement include:

  1. How will additional educational needs be handled?
  2. If your child requires additional tutoring, which parent will pay for it?
  3. Does transportation need to be included in your agreement? If so, will a parent be compensated for time spent transporting the child, gas money, special transportation arrangements for school and other activities?

Another useful tool that can be written into your marital settlement agreement is the use of software for keeping track of your child’s schooling. Technological tools can be a great way to reduce potential conflict between parents. Programs such as Our Family Wizard allows both parents to have access to the latest medical records, school information and a joint calendar for easier schedule coordination between parents. You may not want to specify the software program, but have an agreement to use one and spell out what the program should include. Technology changes quickly and it would be prudent to keep your options open.

A parenting coordinator can be useful during times of conflict for divorced parents. a parenting coordinator is a person who is familiar with your marital settlement agreement, thereby allowing him or her to effectively work with both parents. The parenting coordinator is a standby for communication and decision making. Keep in mind this should be a neutral third-party.

No Contest Divorce Law, LLC offers a free questionnaire to get started with your marital settlement agreement. In addition, please feel free to visit the Marital Settlement Agreement section in our blog for more ideas on how to create your personalized and specific marital agreement with your spouse.

For further reading on divorce and special needs children consider the book Divorce and the Special Needs Child: A Guide for Parents. The book includes a checklist and further resources. If you have other reading or software suggestions please share them with our parents in the comments section below.

HOW TO INCLUDE GRANDPARENTS IN A SETTLEMENT AGREEMENT

Grandparents are living longer, and this means more involvement in their grandchildren’s lives. Being a grandparent to children of divorced parents has become a modern reality. The emotional turmoil and uncertainty of your divorce has the potential to make grandparents fearful of losing their relationship with their grandchildren. Getting a grandparent’s visitation rights written into a martial settlement agreement can provide structure for your grandchildren and give them the comfort of knowing that they will continue to be part of their grandchildren’s lives in the future.

There are several ways that you can help grandparents to cope with your divorce, and how to help them stay in their grandchildren’s lives. Consider the following suggestions for helping grandparents cope with your divorce, and for including grandparents in your marital settlement agreement.

The first step is to give grandparents space to grieve, it’s part of the emotional healing process. Many of the dreams that grandparents may have had are no longer a reality, and there is a deep disappointment which comes with facing the reality of the situation. Even if grandparents may have suspected things weren’t going well in the marriage, the traumatic news can be difficult to emotionally cope with.

Feelings of guilt are also normal. Grandparents may feel guilty for a variety of reasons. Some of the reasons can include guilt from their own divorce and how it has impacted your mariage. Grandparents may wonder if they could have done something to prevent the divorce. Don’t let them fall into the trap of being stuck in guilt. Gently communicate with them and help grandparents move their emotions in a positive direction.

Ask the grandparents to keep their opinions to themselves when around your spouse and thier grandchildren. Staying as neutral as possible will not only give your family some stability, but will leave the door open for spending more time with their grandchildren. Divorce is between you and your spouse, and it is not their place to pick sides and verbally annihilate your spouse. A great way to include grandparents at this difficult time of divorce is by asking them to help watch their grandchildren. This could be a few hours of time for them to connect and feel a part of their grandchildren’s lives instead of feeling threatened and alientated. It can also give you the break that you’ll need during the difficult time of divorce.

Encourage grandparents to listen to their grandchildren when the grandchildren talk about the divorce. After all, the grandparents may be the only ones that your children feel comfortable expressing themselves to and they can provide a safe place for them to blow off some steam. Don’t make the mistake of forcing grandparents to take sides or pass judgment on your soon to be ex-spouse. Also, they may able to help the grandchildren to express themselves if they don’t have the vocabulary to express their emotions.

When you are negotiating your marital settlement agreement with your spouse, you may want to ask yourself these questions:

  1. How much time do the grandparents get with their grandchildren?
  2. Are there opportunities for the grandparents to help out, such as picking up a grandchild from school once a week? Taking the grandchildren to an activity?
  3. When do the grandparents get to see their grandkids?
  4. Will the grandchildren be part of family get togethers, reunions and celebrations?
  5. Will grandchildren travel with their grandparents? If so, when? How often?

Once you are ready to have your marital settlement agreement finalized, Attorney Cairns can create a marital settlement agreement for you and your spouse to sign. You can contact Attorney Cairns for a free consultation at 888.863.9115 or start right away by clicking on DIVORCE MASTER. Read client testimonials and see why No Contest Divorce Law, LLC is a better choice.

5 TIPS ON HOW TO SAVE MONEY DURING DIVORCE

You have realized that traditional divorces are expensive, especially with an average attorney’s rate ranging from $150 – $300 an hour. Here are some practical tips on how you can save money during a divorce.

Organize

Start with buying yourself a three-ring binder, tabs and pocket folders (make sure they have the holes punched in them for your binder). Your tabs will grow over time. To get you started think about financial accounts, property, taxes, loans, insurance, business, other assets, debts, children/grandparents (i.e., schedules), and pets. Leave a section for questions. Write them down as you think about them, you don’t have to get the answers immediately. Your organized binder will be a great reference for when you are ready to negotiate the settlement agreement with your spouse. You will have everything in one place and won’t be left worrying if you forgot something.

Do your homework

Figure out the value of your assets and debts. Start by looking at your credit report and create an assessment of your finances (you can get a free copy of your credit report online). For financial items often overlooked, click on the words overlooked finances. If you suspect your spouse is hiding assets click on hidden asset for more information. You want a clear picture of what your financial future will hold for you. Knowing exactly what you are dealing with can save you money when negotiating with your spouse for a settlement agreement.

Uncontested Divorce

Uncontested divorces are a cost-effective way of getting a divorce. Try to figure out how you and your spouse can have a mutually agreed upon divorce. If you can’t find a common ground you can end up in a long drawn out court battle, costing both of you a considerable amount of money. Some people have spent more money on their divorce then on their wedding. The lawyers can end up with more of your money in a divorce then either you or your spouse in the end. Ask yourself if a constested divorce is worth it.

Letting Go

When you and your spouse are ready to negotiate a martial settlement agreement, you will most likely have several personal items to go through, anything from the toaster to pictures. If you and your spouse cannot agree on whom should get an item consider why you want it. Often the hardist part of letting go is because of an emotional attachment, not the financial value. Figure out how to get what you really want, see if you can use it to negotiate for something else.

Emotional Control

Divorce is very emotional, but you don’t want to enter a settlement agreement fully pumped up on emotions. You want to make the best financial decisions possible for your future. When the emotions have ran their course, you are going to be left with the reality of what you previously negotiated. Find ways to blow off steam: therapist, friends, spiritual advisor, exercise or even punching pillows before you talk to your spouse. Think of this as a business plan. Being emotionally savvy will save you money, possibly get you extra money and give you a more secure future. Try to take the emotions out of the property settlement negotiations. Think of it as business. It will only work if you both get something out of the agreement.

Once you have gotten your binder and done your homework, contact No Contest Divorce Law, LLC for a free initial consultation at 215-398-6760. For an immediate free virtual consultation click on DIVORCE MASTER. The Divorce Wizard will analyze and qualify your case for an online Pennsylvania divorce, calculate your legal fees, and file your case immediately. It’s just like sitting in our office for a free consultation. Also, read our client testimonials to see what other clients think of our services.

WHY JOURNAL DURING DIVORCE

Journaling during your uncontested divorce can be an invaluable tool. This can be a place where you relieve stress, collect your thoughts and let out pent up emotions. Note, this journal should be separate from your daily journal where you keep track of your day to day divorce details, such as how much time you spend with the kids. For more information on daily journaling to protect yourself click on PROTECTING MYSELF.

There are different ways you can use your divorce journal. If you are seeing a therapist or counselor your journal can be helpful during your process of healing and recovery. In addition, having to show your journal on a weekly basis keeps you on track with your commitment to writing. Also, some people have gone on to either publish a book or work in the field of divorce one they complete their own divorce.

Some individuals will spend a considerable amount of time in searching out the perfect looking journal, something that speaks to her/him, others are fine with a generic notebook from the local store. Pick out what feels comfortable to you.

Don’t limit yourself by feeling you are not a writer. Everyone has a little writing muse hanging around, just put pen to paper and start writing what comes to mind. It doesn’t have to be perfect. In fact, don’t read the first few entries, just keep writing away for 2-4 weeks without reading. Grammar, punctuation and all the things your English teacher told you matter don’t matter here. What’s important is that you just do it, like Nike says.

There are some items to keep in mind to make your journaling as productive as possible. First, find a quiet place. If you have kids, get up before them and start writing or wait till later in the evening when you have finished dinner and have a moment to yourself.

Journaling during your uncontested divorce can be an invaluable tool. This can be a place where you relieve stress, collect your thoughts and let out pent up emotions. Note, this journal should be separate from your daily journal where you keep track of your day to day divorce details, such as how much time you spend with the kids. For more information on daily journaling to protect yourself click on PROTECTING MYSELF.

There are different ways that you can use your divorce journal. If you are seeing a therapist or counselor your journal can be helpful during your process of healing and recovery. In addition, having to show your journal to your therapist on a weekly basis can help to keep you on track with your commitment to writing. Also, some people have gone on to either publish a book or work in the field of divorce one they complete their own divorce.

Some individuals will spend a considerable amount of time in searching out the perfect looking journal, something that speaks to her/him, others are fine with a generic notebook from the local store. Pick out what feels comfortable to you.

Don’t limit yourself by feeling you are not a writer. Everyone has a little writing muse hanging around, so just put pen to paper and start writing what comes to mind. It doesn’t have to be perfect. In fact, don’t read the first few entries, just keep writing away for 2-4 weeks without reading. Grammar, punctuation and all the things your English teacher told you matter don’t matter here. What’s important is that you just do it, like the Nike commercial says.

There are some items to keep in mind to make your journaling as productive as possible. First, find a quiet place. If you have kids, get up before they do and start writing, or wait until later in the evening when you have finished dinner and have a quiet moment to yourself.

Write from you heart. Write down whatever comes into your mind. Don’t be concerned with anything except expressing yourself since no one will see it unless you show them. Keep on writing until you feel you no longer have something to write. Challenge yourself and just keep writing until you have exhausted your feelings and thoughts. Divorce can take a while to work through, so don’t be concerned that you seem to be going around in circles. This too shall pass.

While writing you don’t have to be nice. This is the place where you can write what you really think of your spouse. You can yell at him/her, tell him/her how hurt you are, what really made you angry– you get the picture. If you are having a hard time writing down your feelings about your divorce, write about how you have been physically affected. This may include how your heart was racing, how your blood was boiling and/or how your stomach got cramped up and you felt nauseas. Make sure though you keep this journal in safe place away from your spouse.

Journaling can be a great way to effectively and inexpensively express yourself and move through your emotions and the grieving process. Make the commitment today to yourself to go get a journal and start writing. You may want to pick up a journaling book or do some online research about journaling that can give you some ideas to get started.

One way to save the stress of an expensive divorce is by getting a simple, no-fault, uncontested divorce with No Contest Divorce Law, LLC. There are no hidden fees and you will know all your costs upfront. Contact No Contest Divorce Law, LLC for a free consultation at 215-398-6760.

For an immediate free virtual consultation click on DIVORCE MASTER.

The Divorce Master analyzed and qualifies your case for an online Pennsylvania divorce, calculates your legal fees, and files your case immediately. It’s just like sitting in our office for a free consultation.

Read client testimonials to see learn about our clients’ experiences.

5 EASY STEPS TO PROTECT YOURSELF DURING DIVORCE

There are several steps you can take during an uncontested divorce to protect yourself. Though your divorce may be “amicable”, it’s wise to take measures ahead of time to safe guard yourself and your property. We are talking about your personal property, not jointly owned or marital property. So, don’t start hiding jointly owned property, or you can easily set yourself up for a contested divorce – meaning more time, money, hassles, and stress before your Pennsylvania divorce can be finalzed.

Keep a daily journal. This may sound like an imposition with everything else going on, but will come in handy later on should you need it. Address each entry to your attorney. Should your spouse try to subpoena your journal, this will make it harder since it could be considered privileged communication between you and your lawyer. That being said, keep your journal in a safe place. If it’s on your computer, then use a password that only you know in order to get into your computer. Remember to record only the facts, this is especially important if your spouse tries to use the journal against you. Some of the items you want to include in your daily journal are:

1. Bills you have paid;

2. Money you have give to your spouse and/or children;

3. Time you have spent with your child(ren);

4. Any item which you feel is important to your divorce;

5. Arguments with your spouse;

6. Significant events;

7. Telephone calls; and

8. Emails.

Record all of the property in your home. Walk through your house and take pictures and/or videotape each item in each room. Don’t forget to turn on the date on your camera or video camera. Think of items which not only have a monetary value, but also a sentimental value. Some of the items to include in your inventory are: jewelry, clothes, furniture, antiques and electronics. Remember to record items in your attic, basement and detached structures such as a shed. If something is missing later on, this will serve as evidence to its existence in your home. You may want to store the pictures or videos in your private safety deposit box in order to make sure it’s not subject to being tampered with by your spouse.

Reduce your bills. Meet right away with your spouse and see how you can cut down on your bills. This would include extra phone lines, perks such as caller id, cable, shopping around for cheaper insurance and call your credit card company and ask for a lower interest rate.

Secure your personal documents. Move your documents such as: birth certificate, passport, diplomas to a trusted friend’s home or get a safe deposit box in your name only. For communal documents such as tax forms and bank records make a copy and add the copy to your safe stash of documents.

Start establishing your own credit. Get a credit card in your name only and start building up your own credit rating. Be prudent when using the card. You may want to initially store it in your safety deposit box as well. It can be a good backup source of funds if an emergency arises, as well.

Once you’ve taken the above steps to protect yourself, you’re ready to file for an uncontested divorce. Contact No Contest Divorce Law, LLC for a free consultation at 215-398-6760.

For an immediate free virtual consultation click on THE DIVORCE MASTER.

The Divorce Master will analyze and qualify your case for an online Pennsylvania simple, no-fault, uncontested divorce, calculate your legal fees, and file your case immediately. It’s just like sitting in our office for a free consultation.

Read client testimonials to see learn about our clients’ experiences.

HOW MARITAL SETTLEMENT AGREEMENTS SAVE YOU MONEY

A marital settlement agreement, also referred to as a MSA, is an opportunity for couples to save money on the division of their assets and debts, without having a judge decide for them. If a couple is not able to come to an agreement they will spend a considerable amount more in money and time fighting the issues out in court. The trend of today’s savvy divorcing couples is to spell out their own settlement agreement terms. This means that the couple saves considerable attorney’s fees by deciding the terms for the dissolution of their marriage. They then have their attorney draft the marital settlement agreement and file it with the divorce court. By doing it this way, the couple then does not have to go to court.

Marital settlement agreements are legal contracts which define the terms of a divorce for couples with or without children. This option is available when both parties consent to the terminating conditions of their divorce and plans for the future. Conditions for an agreement can include a range of items such as: wedding debt, personal property, spousal support, child financial responsibilities, involvement of grandparents, pets,and frequent flier miles.

Couples have the freedom to decide which items are of importance and should be included in their marital settlement agreement. They become the authors of their lives after divorce; instead of being forced to accept the order of a Master or Judge after lengthy and expensive divorce litigation. If divorcing couples can find mutual ground they can tailor their agreement to their personal needs. This means saving headaches, time and money and is one way to divorce “on budget”.

There are different ways to work on a Pennsylvania marital settlement agreement with a spouse. Some couples have an initial conversation and go from there. Another option is to have one party write up a draft and then email his/her spouse, they go back and forth a few times until they have terms they feel are acceptable. Also, it’s important to keep in mind that each person will have to compromise in order to create a fair agreement. It’s very rare for a person to get everything he/she wants.

If you hire No Contest Divorce Law, LLC to draft your Pennsylvania marital settlement agreement, you will be emailed a marital settlement agreement questionnaire. Just fill out the questionnaire and No Contest Divorce Law, LLC will draft your agreement promptly. The questionnaire will help you to address important areas that you should consider. This is a good way not to overlook critical issues. You can always contact No Contest Divorce Law, LLC if you have questions about the terms of your marital settlement agreement.

In addition, couples who come to an agreement with their spouse will be spared additional emotional trauma. Divorce tends to catapult people into uncharted emotional territories where they find themselves experiencing unsettling emotions. Couples who decide to battle it out in court increase the frequency of painful episodes and often take a lot longer to emotionally heal. With an agreed upon marital settlement agreement, divorcing couples tend to emotionally recuperate quicker.

Once you and your spouse have agreed to the terms of your divorce, contact No Contest Divorce Law, LLC to file the legal paperwork at 215-398-6760 or start right away by clicking on MARITAL SETTLEMENT AGREEMENT.

You are also invited to read our client testimonials. See what others have to say about our services.